Last edited by Zulujas
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of early records of Sir Robert Cotton"s Library found in the catalog.

early records of Sir Robert Cotton"s Library

formation, cataloguing, use

by Colin G. C. Tite

  • 355 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by British Library in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Cotton, Robert, Sir, 1571-1631 -- Library,
    • British Library. Dept. of Manuscripts -- Catalogs,
    • Private libraries -- England -- Catalogs,
    • Manuscripts -- England -- Catalogs

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

      StatementColin G.C. Tite.
      GenreCatalogs.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsZ997.C847 T58 2003
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvii, 297 p. :
      Number of Pages297
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3364074M
      ISBN 100712348247
      LC Control Number2004426766
      OCLC/WorldCa54043250

      COTTON, Sir Robert, 1st Bt. (c), of Combermere, Cheshire. He demonstrated his political independence early in the –5 session when, on 22 Nov. , he, along with his fellow Cheshire Member Sir John Mainwaring, 2nd Bt., spoke in defence of the prisoners in the Lancashire Plot, being one of the Members who informed the House. Cotton Grower is a time-honored brand among growers, allied crop consultants, ginners, suppliers, researchers and others who help make the U.S. one of the world’s leading cotton producing nations. It provides a unique mix of content geared to help today’s sophisticated cotton growers achieve high yields, production efficiency and marketing success.

      In the Harley Library, formed by the politician and book collector Robert Harley (), first Earl of Oxford, and his son Edward (), second Earl of Oxford; the volume docketed 16 October , a year after the library was moved from Brampton Bryan to London.   Fortunately, one book has a diagram of Cotton's Library: Sir Robert Cotton, , by Kevin Sharpe. View at Google Books (no preview) or Amazon (no reviews). On pages , there is a description of the library and a simple line drawing (a rectangle with some text) that illustrates its arrangement.

      None of his descendents came to America. Some descendents were members of parliament. The line isn't hard to research. Sir Robert Bruce Cotton was the owner of the famous Cotton Library which the members of the government used and which eventually was taken by the government. There was no Sir John Bertie Cotton. There wasn't even a John Bertie.   WINGFIELD, Sir ROBERT (?–), diplomatist, born about , was the seventh son of Sir John Wingfield of Letheringham, Suffolk. His brothers Sir Humphrey [q. v.] and Sir Richard (?–) [q. v.] are separately noticed. He was brought up by Anne, lady Scrope, his stepmother (Blomefield, Norfolk, i. ).


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Early records of Sir Robert Cotton"s Library by Colin G. C. Tite Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The early records of Sir Robert Cotton's Library: formation, cataloguing, use. [Colin G C Tite]. Significant records - never previously studied as a whole - survive from the early years of Cotton's library and this book edits and analyses these, throwing important new light on Sir Robert, his son and grandson as collectors, and providing much fresh evidence on the history of their collection and its development.

The Cotton or Cottonian library is a collection of manuscripts once owned by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton MP (–), an antiquarian and later became the basis of what is now the British Library, which still holds the collection. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, many priceless and ancient manuscripts that had belonged to the monastic libraries began to be.

Sir Thomas Cotton's marriage with Margaret Howard ended inwhich had been the year that Thomas Cotton's father, Sir Robert Cotton, permanently moved residence to The Cotton House, along with the library which remained in the Cotton House until Sir Robert Cotton's death nine years later in Born: Robert Bruce Cotton, 22 January.

The early records of Sir Robert Cotton's Library: formation, cataloguing, use by Colin G. C Tite (); Sir Robert Cotton, history and politics in early modern England by Kevin Sharpe (Book); A fly in amber, being an extravagant biography of the romantic antiquary Sir Robert Bruce Cotton by Hope Mirrlees (Book).

One of these founding collections is the library of Sir Robert Bruce Cotton (), an antiquarian, bibliophile, and Member of Parliament. According to early records of Sir Robert Cottons Library book, Cotton began collecting inwhen he was about seventeen years old.

The history of libraries began with the first efforts to organize collections of of interest include accessibility of the collection, acquisition of materials, arrangement and finding tools, the book trade, the influence of the physical properties of the different writing materials, language distribution, role in education, rates of literacy, budgets, staffing, libraries for.

family's direct interest in the library on the death of Sir John Cotton, grandson of Sir Robert, in ^ Certainly there no longer exists a block of Cottonian printed books in the British Library's holdings to parallel its collection of the family's manuscripts.

One Cotton family's true medieval origins (including Sir Robert Bruce Cotton's) In my spare time, I have researched my Cotton ancestry using mainly the resources available at the British Library, the Library of the Institute of Historical Research of the University of London, and the Library of the Society of Genealogists.

COTTON, Sir Robert Carrington (–) Senator for New South Wales, –78 (Liberal Party of Australia) Robert Carrington (Bob) Cotton, accountant, timber producer and company director, was born in Broken Hill on 29 Novemberthe first of seven children of Hugh Leslie (Les) Carrington Cotton and Muriel Florence, née Pearce.

Robert Cotton had a hobby: for decades he had been collecting documents, manuscripts, books, records. He had an insatiable desire to collect and preserve the history of the written word in England, and he created a library with more documents (it was said at the time) than the Records Office in London.

A particularly good overview of Robert Cotton and the historical impact of his library is Sir Robert Cotton, History and Politics in Early Modern England, by Keven Sharpe (Ox ford U. Press). The following is an extended extract that I hope well serves Sharpe's material.

: Sir Robert Cotton, History and Politics in Early Modern England (Oxford Historical Monographs) (): Sharpe, Kevin: BooksCited by: Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet (c. – 18 December ) was an English politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Cheshire from to and from to He was the eldest surviving son of Thomas Cotton of Combermere Abbey, Cheshire, and his wife Elizabeth Calveley, daughter of Sir George Calveley of Lea (aka Calverley).His ancestor Sir George.

The Cottons were descended from the Scottish royal line of Robert Bruce through the marriage in of William Cotton to Mary de Wesenham, the great-grandaughter and heir of Sir John Bruce This match brought the family Conington in Huntingdonshire and Exton in Rutland. Early life. Cotton was the eldest son of Sir Lynch Cotton.

He was educated at Westminster School, Shrewsbury School, and then entered Trinity Hall, Cambridge, in He was one of the founders of the Tarporley Hunt Club in Domestic life. Cotton married Frances Stapleton, daughter and co-heiress of James Russel-Stapleton Esq in Go back to Early Records menu Go back to signalled an evident end to the library's association with the public schools.

The Lyceum and Library Society continued to function as a separate entity until when the city merged it with the Fisk Library to form the New Orleans Public Library.

At the rear of this book are records for other. The first true national library was founded in as part of the British new institution was the first of a new kind of museum – national, belonging to neither church nor king, freely open to the public and aiming to collect everything.

The museum's foundations lay in the will of the physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane, who gathered an enviable collection of. Another help which I had for the perfecting of these Journals were the two Manuscript Volumes of Fragmentary and Imperfect Journals, or rather Collections of the Parliaments and Sessions of Parliament of Queen Elizabeth's Reign, which remained in Sir Robert Cottons well known and much famoused Library, in the said Yearsand out of.

Simon Cotton, supposed to be the son of William Cotton, though the earliest mention I have found so far of this first of many William Cottons to come is in a family tree drawn up under the auspices of Sir Robert Bruce Cotton roughly years after Simon Cotton's appearance in a Cheshire court case, standing accused of cattle rustling.

Sir Robert Cotton, Baronet. Sir Robert Cotton, first Baronet, in later life. This is credited as being he, but the arms below the portrait do not match any Cotton arms.

– BIRTH: Aged 77 years in at time of death DISTINCTION: Baronet, title created 29 Mar by Charles II. Previously knighted, MP for Cheshire – After Sir Robert Cotton's death in James remained in the service of his son, Sir Thomas, at whose house in Westminster he died early in December of a quartan fever.

He was buried in St. Margaret's Church, Westminster, on 8 December; the register describes him as "Mr. Richard James, that most famous antiquary". James was unmarried.The Bold family, of the Lancashire township bearing the same name, trace their origins back to Anglo-Saxon times before the Norman Conquest of The earliest known record mentions a William de Bold inbut it is thought that the foundations Bold Hall (old hall) were laid well before that.

It was inthat John de Bold was the.